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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
and real. again, you are competing with the u.k. parliament. they put their tax at 20%. there is no tax on repatriation. japan used to be the highest tax rate in the world, and we were second, and now, we are first. it is imperative from a competitive point of view. it is the absence of any decision that has got that trillions sitting on the sidelines waiting for some clarity about where we are going. long term fiscal responsibility. the handshake is there. the free market is in place. -- the framework is in place. we believe in these principles, and revenue is part of it. i would gladly give this up if i thought it was real long-term entitlement reform. >> just to be clear, you are talking about individual or corporate? >> from my perspective, i am part of that 2% that the people do not trust. but it is all about are we going to do the hard things? i would give it up in a minute. i would even give up the 42% if i knew it was going to the right thing. and it was long term comprehensive reform. i am just telling you. i would in a moment. and i do not think i am alone. i know the hearts o
it came out almost two years ago. we said that the uk consolidation would fail. it had too much revenue. as we are seeing now, millionaires and billionaires are heading for the exit. that is what we are going to see. >> thank you. mr. chairman, i yield back. >> i would like to congratulate the chairman on his election and the fine work he has done as chairman of this committee and to congratulate mr. brady on being selected as his chair of this committee and the next congress. for our distinguished witnesses, they agreed that what we need to do is have a long- term solution. i would like to ask dr. zandi how we achieve that. we are several million dollars apart from the president's proposal. how would you close that gap? outline the president's proposal and speaker boehner's proposal. how can we get people employed and move our economy forward? >> i apologize. there will be a fair amount of numbers here. the president's tax revenue proposal amounts to about $1.6 trillion over a 10-year period. that is from higher tax rates. roughly 600 billion are from some kind of tax reform. they are
and will probably happen in europe. the u.k. specialized in being the home of trading. they certainly don't want that to be taxed. so yes, there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns, or at least it is in the running for number one. i have been to washington many times and am involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. >> let's give a round of applause for lynn. [applause] we have the opportunity for you to purchase and have the book signed. we thank you all for being here. if you have further questions, she will be here signing books, so come and talk to her. >> in the fall of 1774, the british admiral and generals and diplomats were reporting to the crown that the colonists for sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and so-called subversive acts. it is
and australia and the uk. the political aspect would be huge. >> low-income students are risk averse. they do not have secret bank accounts where they can address the situation. and if they fail, the burdens of being on them. they are less likely to pursue a college education if it means earning more than their parents do in a year. we expect pell grant recipients to graduate with more debt than middle and upper income students. they are anywhere from 150% more likely to graduate. we are burdening those the least capable of the most that. the problem is that they are going to impact access. >> the point before you go on, a lot of that is about communicating to families what this means. it is far from perfect, but they are borrowing well beyond their families capability, baking on the fact that they will be able to. i don't disagree that there isn't a perfect model, but i think it has huge potential. >> i want to move on to questions from the audience because i want to get in as many as possible. i think what is interesting, so far, there seems to be a lot of changes that would take political
and repayment would be income base of. their problems with the model that needs to be worked out. in the u.k. needs to unveil this model. students or a concerned about the potential outcome. as the thought through and worked to it. it is an equitable model. the problem with doing anything up front as we did not know what they're earning potential will be until they are actually earning. any model we put up in place, there will be adjustments made. i really think making it all loan based and having loans repaid the base daunting come and the set of rules that would keep people from gaming the system based on their incomes as a better model than trying to plug the holes to increase pell or not. it addresses the up front issues with students who are really the first time it will to assess whether the are prepared to do college level work. this secure the loan debt. if we base on their income, if that is done influence their income, there are off the hook. the model and the funding has to work. i am not an economist. of a buffet and the out with you now. in terms of ideas that i see as games cha
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)